DIXCOT.

1897

8 North Drive,
Tooting, Wandsworth Borough, SW 16, London.

For Richard Walter Essex.
 

1916 alterations to study and billiard room.
The walls are roughcast, the windows have stone dressings and the roofs are of slate.


STREATHAM PARK.
DIXCOTE, NORTH DRIVE, of 1897 for R. W. Essex, was designed by Voysey but executed by Walter Cave. It is Voysey's largest London house, a little crammed in, but of the happy rambling composition characteristic of the great architect; also with one of his typical massive, trustworthy chimneys. (Good staircase.)
Source: London 2: South, by Bridget Cherry and Nikolaus Pevsner, p. 700

 

According to Wendy Hitchmough, disagreements between Voysey and his client caused him to abandon the design,
and a revised version was built under the supervision of Walter F. Cave.

Cave modified Voysey's design in many details.

 

Voysey wrote in a letter to The Building News in December 1899:
“I HAVE nothing to say about my design for “Dixcot,” Tooting, except that my client wanted me to add 12in. to the height of the windows without altering my design, which, of course, I declined to do, so the house is being built by another man. For the sake of economy I was proposing to use 9in. brick cement rough- cast for the walls. The roof was to be of green Westmoreland slate, with lead hips and ridges. The window and door dressings. Monk’s Park stone with iron casements. C. F. A. Voysey.”
Source:
archiseek.com

The plans and views given herewith of these two country houses, designed by Mr. C.F.A. Voysey, are, to a large extent, self-explanatory. Both buildings illustrate that quaint sense of the picturesque which the architect of these residences has associated so tastefully with all his designs. The walls are finished in a white rough cast, the roofs are covered with stone slab slates, with red ridge tiles and chimney-pots, while the wood- work is coloured a good strong green.”
Published in The Building News, September 2 1898.
Source: http://archiseek.co

 

Contemporary photographs c.1900

Contemporary photographs c.1900 (RIBA Photographs Collection) published in
Charles Holme (ed), Modern British Domestic Architecture and Decoration, 1901,
C. F. A. Voysey "The Orchard," pp. 181-193 & 194;
and selected works of F. W. Bedford and S. D. Kitson (p. 35); W. H. Brierley (p. 55);
A house at Crowborough, Sussex, reproduced from a Pencil Drawing by R. A. Briggs (p. 59);
John Cash (p. 62);
Walter F. Cave (p. 63); Edward S. Prior (p. 150);
M. H. Baillie Scott, pp. 157, 159, 161; W. H. Seth-Smith (p. 164 & 165)
.

Complete PDF version (54 MB) of the Charles Holme book,
housed at the University of Toronto.
www.archive.org/details/modernbritishdom00holmuoft

 

also referred to as The Studio Special Summer Number, 1901

 

Cave (Voysey)
Charles Holme, Modern British architecture and decoration, p.63

 

Cave (Voysey)
Charles Holme, Modern British architecture and decoration, p.63

 

Cave (Voysey)
Charles Holme, Modern British architecture and decoration, p.63

 

 


 
Image published in: The Studio, Vol. 16, 1899, p. 162
Link > RIBA Drawings Collection

 

 

Image published in: The Building News, September 2 1898
on archiseek.com

Link > RIBA Drawings Collection

 

 

Link > RIBA Drawings Collection


 

Published in: The Building News, December 29th 1899.
 Front & Rear Perspective View & Plans.
Design for Dixcot for R. W. Essex, North Drive, Tooting, London.
Link > archiseek.com
RIBA Drawings Collection

 

 

Link > Photograph by J.J. Stokoe on Flickr

 

 

Photo by Heinz Theuerkauf in 1976

 

 

Photo by Heinz Theuerkauf in 1976

 

 

Link > Photo by Stephen Richards on www.geograph.org.uk

 

 

Photo on www.jjlocations.com

 

 

Photo on www.jjlocations.com

 

 

Photo on www.jjlocations.com

 

 

Photo on www.productionparadise.com
and on www.jjlocations.com

 

 

Photo by Heinz Theuerkauf in 1976

 

Photo by Heinz Theuerkauf in 1976

 

 

 

Photo on www.jjlocations.com

 

 

Photo on www.jjlocations.com

 

 

Photo on www.jjlocations.com

 

 

Photo on www.jjlocations.com

 

 

Photo on www.jjlocations.com

 

 

Photo on www.jjlocations.com

 

 

Photo on www.jjlocations.com

 

 

Photo on www.jjlocations.com

 

 

Photo on www.jjlocations.com

 

 

Photo on www.jjlocations.com

 

 

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Link > https://jjmedia.com/locations/dixcot (Photos)

 

Click on photos for larger size.

Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,32.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,3.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,4.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,36.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
       
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,30.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
     

 

 
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,6.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,7.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,8.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
 Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,9.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
 

 

     
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,10.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,11.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,12.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,13.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
   

 

   
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,39.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,40.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,27.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
   

 

   
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,14.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,15.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,16.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,17.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
 

 

     
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,22.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,19.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,20.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,21.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
   

 

   
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,5.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,23.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,25.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
 
   

 

   
 

Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,37.jpg

Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,38.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,28.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com,43.jpg
Dixcot, photo on jjmedia.com

_____________________________________________

 

Photographs and Drawings Courtesy of The Royal Institute of British Architects.
Photographs, drawings, perspectives and other design patterns
at the Royal Institut of British Architects Drawings and Photographs Collection.
Images can be purchased.
The RIBA can supply you with conventional photographic or digital copies
of any of the images featured in RIBApix.
Link > RIBApix (Voysey Images)

Link > Dixcot, Streatham Park, London (RIBA Image)

Link > Dixcot, Streatham Park, London: the hall and stairs (RIBA Image)

Link > Garden Plan (RIBA Image)

 

Link > Black & White photos on flickr taken in 1976

 

Link > Photo by David Addison on www.imagesofengland.org.uk

Description on imagesofengland.org.uk:

NORTH DRIVE SW16 DRIVE SW16 1. 5033 No 8 (Dixcote) TQ 27SE 4/25 II 2. 1897 by C F A Voysey. Executed by Walter Cave. A broad asymmetrical 7-bay, 2-storey composition, a roughcast with Ham Hill stone dressings and tile roof. The casement windows have stone mullions and leaded lights. On the ground floor the openings are, left to right, a segmental carriage arch with a band of small casements above the whole framed between full-height buttresses; a triple and a double casement framing a plain door; a triple casement; a quadruple casement; a strongly projecting Doric porch, the returns canted on plan; and a quintuple casement. The window heads are linked by a stone string. On the first floor to the right of the carriage arch the second and third bays have respectively triple and double casements and 2 double casements linked by a string at the head and placed between twin gables. The fourth, fifth and sixth bays have triple casements beneath a deep cornice which breaks round the piers framing the fifth bay. The fifth and sixth bay casements are double-height with a lower tier of glazing changing the first floor cullband to a transom. The seventh bay triple casement and its cornice read as a half-dormer between hipped eaves roofs supported on iron stays. The stacks have cornices, the left-hand stack being of characteristic battered form.

 

References

The British Architect, L, p. 6.

The Studio,  XVI, 1899, p. 162.

The Builder's Journal & Architectural Record, XI, 1900, p. 326.

C. Holme (ed.), Modern British Domestic Architecture and Decoration, 1901.

 

 

> Return to Voysey Home page <

 

 

 besucherzaehler-homepage.de

 

 

 

  PflegeStufenAntrag.com